hello

hello1 Arabic – Marhaba
2
Armenian – Barev
3
Bahamas – heyello
4
Basque – kaixo
5
Austrian German – gruess gott
6
Bengali – namaskar
7
Bulgarian – zdraveite
8
Burmese – mingalarbar
9
Catalan – hola
10
Chamorro – hafa adai
11
Chichewa – moni bambo (To a male), moni mayi (To a female)
12
Chinese (Cantonese) – nay ho
13
Chinese (Mandarin) – ni hau
14
Congo – mambo
15
Croatian – boke
16
Czech – ahoj
17
Danish – hej
18
Dutch – goedendag
19
Esperanto – saluton
20
Finnish – hyvää päivää
21
French – salut
22
Gaeilge – dia duit
23
Georgian – gamardjoba
24
German – Tag
25
Gujarathi – kem che
26
Greek – yia sou
27
Hawaiian – aloha
28
Hebrew – shalom
29
Hindi – namaste
30
Hungarian – Magyar jo napot
31
Icelandic – góðan dag
32
Igbo – nde-ewo
33
Indonesian bahasa – halo
34
Italian – ciào
35
Japanese – ohayou gozaimasu
36
Kanien’kéha (Mohawk) – kwe kwe
37
Kannada – namaskara
38
Klingon – nook-neck
39
Korean – ahn nyeong ha se yo
40
Kurdish – choni
41
Lao – sabaidee
42
Latin – salve
43
Latvian – labdien
44
Lingala – mbote
45
Lithuanian – laba diena
46
Luxembourgish – MOY-en
47
Malayalam – namaskkaram
48
Maori – kia ora
49
Marathi – namaskar
50
Mongolia – sain baina uu?
51
Nahuatl – niltze
52
Navajo – ya’at’eeh
53
Nepali – namaskar, kasto cha
54
Northern German – moin moin
55
Northern Shoto – dumelang
56
Norwegian – hallo
57
Oshikwanyama – wa uhala po, meme? (female), wa uhala po, tate? (male)
58
Persian – salaam
59
Polish – dzień dobry
60
Portuguese – oi
61
Romanian – salut
62
Russian – zdravstvuyte
63
Samoan – talofa
64
Scanian – go’da
65
Senegal – salamaleikum
66
Serbian – zdravo
67
Sinhala – a`yubowan (ar-yu-bo-wan)
68
Slovak – dobrý deň
69
Slovenian – zhivyo
70
English (South African) – howzit or Hello
71
Spanish – O-la
72
Swahili – jambo
73
Swedish – hej
74
Swiss German – grüzi
75
Tagalog – kumusta ka
76
Tahitian – ia orana
77
Tamil – vanakkam
78
Telugu – baagunnara
79
Tetum – bondia
80
Thai – sawa dee-ka (female), sawa dee-krap (male)
81
Taiwanese – Li Ho
82
Shanghainese – nong hao
83
Tsonga – minjhani
84
Turkish – merhaba
85
Ukranian – pryvit
86
Urdu – adaab
87
Vietnamese – xin chào
88
Welsh (North Wales) – shwmai
89
Yiddish – sholem aleikhem
90
Zulu – sawubona
91
Sinhala – āyubūvan
92
Punjabi – Sata srī akāla
93
Javanese – Halo
94
Pashto – khe chare, salaam, as-salaamu’ alaykum
95
Sundanese – Halo
96
Hausa – Sannu
97
Odia – Namascara
98
Burmese – min-ga-la-ba
99
Hakka – ngi ho
100
Bhojpuri – prannam
101 Afrikaans – Goeiedag or Hallo
102 Xhosa – Molo

Please contact us if your language is not listed here so we can add it!

Interesting Stuff - Antique Writing Desk

The Oldest Handwritten Letter:

According to the testimony of ancient historian Hellanicus, the first recorded hand written letter (epistle) was by Persian Queen Atossa daughter of Syrus, mother of Xerxes around 500 BC.

The leaves of plants and the bark of trees advanced the use of writing. The linden tree was particularly good allowing the folding of its bark. Egyptian papyrus made possible the ancient libraries of Alexandria and Pergamum. The Roman Emperor Claudius developed a new stronger type of cross layered papyrus which was not damaged by the use of the calamus (reed).

Papyrus became so popular a writing material that laws were introduced preventing it leaving its country of origin in the East. This caused a shortage of papyrus in the West which led to the introduction of new writing materials Vellum and Parchment produced from animal skins. Saxons of the dark ages used the bark of the beech tree, called boc, from whence comes the word book.

The style (pen) used in ancient times was made from wood, metal or bone shaped to a point. A reed was used on papyrus and parchment dipped in Indian/China ink, made from the secretion of cuttlefish. The 5th century saw the use of (goose) quills in Saxon England.
Lead pencils were used in ancient Greece but only as a temporary marker to be rubbed out later. It wasn’t until the 14th century that pencils made from a lead composite became popular and in common use as a writing implement.

About the 10th century from the Far East to the West came cotton paper which was in common use by the 12th century. A great advance in writing material came in the 14th century with the introduction of paper made from linen rags. This method of making paper continued for several hundred years.

The Roman Emperor Trajan commanded that positus (carriers) be stationed at regular distances with chariots waiting to transport important documents, this is where the word post is derived.

Prior to 1840 letters were delivered by courier, coach or horse rider. The receiver of the letter had to pay on its receipt and the cost was dependant on the number of pages and distance traveled. To prevent the contents of the letter from being read by others they were sealed using a coloured wax with ring or handheld seal.

In May 1840 Great Britain introduced the first prepaid stamp nationwide postal delivery service, with the Penny Black stamp (portrait of the young Queen Victoria) for letters under half an ounce and the Twopenny Blue stamp for letters over. This was soon followed by other countries introducing similar systems.

The United States introduced a limited postal service in August 1842 followed by a uniform 5 cents charge in 1845 and standardised stamps in 1847.

~ Reference from handwrittenletters.com